The Past, the Present and the Future, It’s All in You

All of us have a past to look back at. We have fun moments we want to cherish and there are several unfortunate times we want to forget. As much as the wonderful things that we have done, there are also some that we regret doing. There are words that we wish, we never sad. And words we hoped, we had the courage to say.

Life is what we make it. And no matter how we try, the things we have done in the past cannot be undone. That is why we have been told to make the most of the time we have, because we can never regain the time lost. We can only look back, be proud or be ashamed. Some have managed to move on from the things gone wrong but others are still haunted by their decisions.

But life was not all that difficult to live with. There were times when the only decision we had to make was whether to use the professional hair straighteners or just leave the waves alone. There was a time when the choices present were just the blue and grey ties. And although these decisions did not have life changing effect on us, it had an impact on how we felt that day; a day that will probably appear in our biography.

All the decisions we made whether big or small, have contributed a lot to where we are right now. And the past is a constant reminder of the importance of the present. It tells us to stop worrying about the history that we cannot do anything about. The only things that we can affect as of the moment is the time at hand. Most of us have a lot of hang ups in what went before. And the more we linger on that thought, the more we got stuck to a motionless present which will soon become an unproductive past if we let it get the best of us.

Another wall that hinders us from dealing with the present is that we worry too much about the future. Let’s take this man as an example. Instead of attending his child’s ball games, he volunteers to stay at work to impress his employer and hopes that he will be promoted in three years. Sadly, he dies on his second year with the company; he never got promoted and missed all the games of his child. Deal with what you have at the moment to avoid would have-could have in the future.

Life may not always be as simple as professional hair straighteners or ties, but it will surely become better if we learn to let go of a past. And although thinking and preparing for a good future is not bad, we should never worry about it too much, because once we do, we end up ignoring the good things we currently have. And when we finally realized that we have so many things to be thankful for, the chance to appreciate it has already slipped away.

Peak Performance – A Key to Success When Negotiating Salary

For the employee looking for a really high salary it is necessary to make a long term plan to build leverage that can be used in salary negotiations. While there are several ways to increase leverage there is one way better and safer than anyone else: to always strive for excellent performance at work.
 
In a sense, a salary negotiation does not differ from a negotiation over a used car. While the car sales man sells a car, the employer sells his labor. The salary is the price for labor, and nothing else.
 
As any price for a good or service, the salary – the labor price – is affected by the laws of demand and supply. There is generally a high demand from the employers for highly productive labor, meaning labor producing much value in a short period of time. In general, there is also a quite low supply of such labor. Few people performs above average otherwise, the average performance would be higher.
 
This means, in effect, that the price for highly productive labor in general is higher that the price for other labor.
 
There is an obvious lesson to learn here for the salary negotiator. An employee aiming for a high salary and a successful salary negotiation should always strive to perform above average. He should aim for peak performance. If he enters the salary negotiation as a peak performer, he will have substantially increased his leverage.
 
How can an employee strive for peak performance? Obviously there are several ways to do this. The most basic way is to always focus on the most valuable work tasks, while letting other, less valuable tasks wait or be done by someone else. If he is uncertain as to what tasks are most valuable, he must simply go and ask his boss.
 
If the employee always focuses on the most valuable tasks, he will in general have a higher productivity than everyone else. It is this higher productivity that will give him leverage in the salary negotiation.
 
Thus, peak performance at work is a key to a successful salary negotiation.

Real Estate Negotiations – How Negotiating Skills Make You More Money

Real Estate Negotiations can be one of the most intricate social or business interactions any of us will ever be involved in. Your real estate negotiating skills can make or break a deal. When it comes to real estate negotiations, you’ve got some stiff competition out there, especially when you’re sitting across the table from a savvy investor who has his eye on getting more than he gives. Use these tips to hone your negotiation skills and be ready the next time you’re in the game.

121. Always have an out in case your due diligence is wrong. Subject to Buyer’s Arranging Suitable Financing. Subject to Inspection. Subject to Buyer’s Partner’s Approval. Subject to Independent Analysis of Seller’s Property’s Financial Statement, etc.

122. Here’s one from the famous Ron Legrand: “…if you’re a beginner and worried about the seller finding out you don’t exactly know what you’re doing, don’t sweat it. You don’t have to appear to be an expert. You can try to fake it but, if you’re confronting an intelligent seller, many times they’ll see through you and try to ask you embarrassing questions. So if you’re asked if you’ve ever done this before, use these words: “Well actually, no. This is my first deal after graduating from some rather intense training. I was hoping you’d help me do it right, OK?” Thanks Ron! As far as you, if you’ve read this message on real estate negotiations and read the books recommended, you will definitely be qualified to say this last part about intense training… I give you permission.

123. WRITE A BUSINESS PLAN BEFORE YOU BUY

124. Always know your exit strategy before you go in to a real estate negotiations session. This determines what you need and what you want but don’t need.

125. Never blink first. (This is a metaphor, don’t do the staring game)

126. If there is a “deal breaker” you must get agreement on there’s probably not a great deal, but push for it- you might get it. Real estate negotiations should be fluid and not so rigid that either party MUST get something.

127. Use “they said….” when justifying a reason. THEY who? Who cares…all that matters is that you didn’t say it. THEY did. So you can’t be alone in what you say…it was THEM that said it too. Maybe The Fed Chairman, or the Wall Street Journal or the local news anchor said it.

128. Perception is reality. Control the perception and you control what really IS in negotiations. This is an out-of-the-box negotiation skill but a very powerful one.

129. The optimal temperature for negotiations is 68 degrees. People are most suggestible, open to debate, and flexible in this environment. Don’t ask me how I know that. Sorry, I’ve been sworn to secrecy.

130. Use curiosity to gain attention. People will go to untold lengths to scratch that itch. I could tell you about the government study proving how 77.6% of all people are curious about blank but “Sorry, that’s classified”. That’s one of the sneaky real estate negotiating skills, but not unethical…curiosity has amazing power.

131. Pull the “I’m sorry I can’t get approval for that” routine. Place blame on someone else that you just can’t do that. Then offer to ask “them” again if the person you are negotiating with will do X.

132. Give respect to get respect. Real negotiators know you can’t dictate and you can’t act the fool and expect to reach a mutually beneficial negotiation. Disrespect the other party and they’re more likely to walk away even when you KNOW they need the deal. So be respectful at all times- it is the right thing to do and plus your pocketbook will thank you.

133. If you win a shouting match, chances are you lost the deal. Shouting is NOT a negotiating skill. VERY few times is it advisable to show your anger in a business negotiation (although sometimes this is the very thing that will SEAL the deal, crazily enough).

134. Give people what they want, easier, better, and faster. Why do they need to negotiate with anyone else? The best negotiation tactic sometimes is if you can give them exactly what they want when and how they want it and still come out good…do it and there’s little need for fancy real estate negotiating skills.

135. Let other people know you’re willing (or actively already ARE doing so) to negotiate with another party(ies)…”they offered me X…but…what can YOU do?”

136. There is no room for “EGO” in “nEGOtiations”. Let me spell it out for you: you can be “right” or you can make money…sometimes you have to choose which you want most.

137. Always treat everyone with respect. Even in the midst of a negotiation, take the time to be courteous to all the ancillary players in the game and any bystanders. There is no man from whom you can learn nothing…wow, was that deep or was that deep?