Have Your Audience Sit Up, Take Notice, and Learn at Your Next Presentation

Some presentations are designed to simply motivate your audience. Some are designed to educate them. It’s this second batch that is tricky to do. It’s probably not that your presentations are lacking in educational material, but rather it’s the way that you are delivering it that really matters. You need to find a way to deliver the information in the way that adults learn…

So here’s the answer to this question right off the bat: research shows that adults learn best when information is presented interactively, using role-playing, and peer-to-peer dialog. The lectures that most presenters use are really only good for passing information along to an audience.

The last thing in the world that you want is for your next presentation to remind your audience of a high school or college class. Having you stand at the front of the room and drone on with no chance for interaction is not what today’s audiences are looking for.

The secret to making your presentation “stick” with your audience is to realize that the more active your adult audience is during your presentation, the more they will learn because they will be tapping into the knowledge and experience of their peers.

At different times during your presentation your role as the presenter should really be to be a “guide on a side” who facilitates discussions among audience members and offering feedback as needed.

We’ve all heard about left-brain / right-brain stuff. Our left-brain is set up for the way most presentations are delivered – logical, analytical, and subjective. It’s our right-brain, our visual & creative side, that is not being fed during most presentations.

Much of what it takes to make sure that a presentation appeals to how your adult audience learns has to do with how the presentation event is set up. Here are some key suggestions on how you can make your next presentation a powerful adult learning experience:

  • Use Round Tables: having your audience sit at round (or half round) tables that seat 8 or 10 people helps your audience to interact easily.
  • Schedule Break Time: make sure that your audience has time both before and after your presentation to meet and discuss what they are going to learn and what they have learned.  
  • Use Comfortable Seats: Rarely do we have control over this, but if possible the more comfortable the seats are, the more learning will happen.
  • Lose The Lectern: This can be done as simply as making sure that you have a wireless microphone so that you are not tied to one spot and can move around and interact with your audience.
  • Handouts & Downloads Are Good: You audience is hungry for information that they can take back to the office. Giving them something that they can touch and hold is one way to do this.
  • More Brian Food: This is my favorite. Most food that is served during a presentation can be sugar or carb-heavy. If possible, provide healthful food options.

At the end of the day, you go to a lot of effort to get ready to deliver a presentation. You want your audience to be impacted by your words and you want them to be able to absorb and learn from the information that you are presenting. If you follow these tips, your audience will have a better chance of learning and retaining what you have to say.

Christening Presents That Are Heaven Sent

A christening is religiously symbolic of a child being religiously cleansed and sanctified, but it’s also an opportunity to celebrate their birth, officially announce the child’s Christian name and to allocate godparents to them. Godparents can then take care of the baby should anything happen to its birth parents and can offer him or her guidance and support as he or she grows up!

As a result religious themed christening presents make good christening presents but frequently modern Christians opt for non-religious gifts too. In this article, we’ll talk about both. A christening scrap book to fill with photos and memories of the day can be a popular gift too.

Religious Presents

Many people opt for christening gifts which has religious symbolism integrated in to them such as the Christian cross. This is a good idea for several reasons. By choosing christening presents which are overtly religious you show your commitment to both the baby and the tone of the day, giving the child a token to mark the occasion directly.

Many people choose more ambiguous or sentimental gifts, but if you want to give christening presents that are religious there are plenty on offer. For example: what about a baby blanket embroidered with a cross, the child’s name and the date of the christening? Or how about a specially made keepsake for a desk or mantel piece which features the word ‘christening’ a Christian cross and some sparkling butterflies?

Useful Gifts

Christening gifts don’t just have to be religious or personal, they can be useful too! Useful christening presents are a good idea because they remind the child about your love and their religion on a daily basis. We love cutlery sets for this reason and some can be personalised making them even more special. Cutlery sets also hark back to the days when it was traditional to give children a silver spoon for their present, while being far more functional and still symbolic.

Plates personalised with the baby’s name, christening date and perhaps a few choice words, also make good presents, being easy to use daily but also precious keepsakes.

Comforts for a Baby

Babies love teddy bears and blankets for a reason. At the earlier stages of development their most potent sense is touch, so soft and cuddly items make great comforting presents. Some babies are quiet and sleep well while others seem to cry constantly and any gifts which help to comfort and quiet them can literally be a godsend to parents.

Tastes have changed a lot throughout the years so now there is a huge range of christening presents available. What about a teddy bear with a Christian cross embroidered in to its sweater with a few personalised words and the child’s name? This is a gift that can be kept as a memento throughout the child’s life, used to comfort and calm the child when he or she cries and also be a personal and religiously pertinent gift.

Gift baskets can also be comforting for both a baby and the parents of the child and make good gifts. Often these contain bath products or sweet treats along with a blanket comforter or a fuzzy bear or rabbit. These remind us of the gifts which Jesus was given by the three wise men on his blessing.

A Bonding Experience

Over all a christening is a day that is all about bonding. It’s about the child being bound by their new religion, parents getting the chance to allow friends and family to meet the baby and of course the godparents also being bound and committed to the child’s welfare.

Christenings are a beautiful day and a happy one; they mark the beginning of the baby’s life and celebrate the child’s birth as well as his or her religion. If you’re looking for christening presents for a little person in your life consider those gifts which are heaven sent. The religiously symbolic and meaningful presents that mark the day as a Christian one.

Also consider christening presents that more subtly denote the Christian mood of the event, such as cutlery (which is reminiscent of the gift of a silver spoon) and gift baskets (which are as luxurious as frankincense of myrrh.)

Gifts for children with a Noah’s ark theme, such as the Noah’s ark money box which can be personalised with the name of the baby, the date of the christening and a few choice words (wither from the bible or your own heart) also make incredible christening gifts!

Southern Chicago Hospital Presents the Art Institute

Patients and visitors to a southern Chicago hospital who are lovers of art are in luck! Chicago’s famous Art Institute is a world-class museum which brings visitors from throughout the world. Founded in 1866 under the name Chicago Academy of Design, it is one of the oldest art schools in the U.S., and it is carrying on the teaching of art and design to this day. Additionally, the Art Institute’s collection presently contains over three hundred thousand works of art distributed among ten departments. The Institute’s objet d’art include paintings, sculpture, photographs, architectural drawings, prints, and textiles from all over the world and thousands of years of history.

The principle building features beaux arts architecture and was constructed for the World’s Columbian Exposition in 1893. Over the years other buildings have been constructed, and the museum presently contains over four hundred thousand square feet of space. The collection of European Painting includes 950 paintings from medieaval times to the early twentieth century, with special emphasis on French painting in the nineteenth century. The most famous exhibit at the Art Institute is the Impressionist and Post Impressionist collection, which includes A Sunday Afternoon on La Grand Jatte by Georges Seurat, Acrobats at the Circus Fernando by Jean Renoir, and thirty-three of Claude Monet’s landscapes. The Modern and Contemporary Art Department contains over 1500 sculptures and paintings from America and Europe made during the twentieth century. The world-renowned African and Amerindian collection features an exhibit of African masks, wood sculpture, ceramics, textiles, beadwork, and furniture from Central, Western and Southern Africa; and also a collection of Mesoamerican and Andes Mountains ceramics, textiles, sculpture, and metal work. South American Indian figurative art and ceramics are also well represented in this collection.

Another world-famous collection which south Chicago hospital visitors might enjoy is European Decorative Arts with over twenty-five thousand objects including ceramics, glass, furniture, metalwork, and ivory dating from the year 1100 to modern times; as well as sculpture from the middle ages to the present. The Textile Department includes over thirteen thousand examples (including over sixty-six thousand swatch samples) from 300 BCE to contemporary designs, representing Asia, Africa, Europe, Guatemala, Mexico, Peru, and Indonesia. There are special collections of pre-Colombian textiles, tapestries, European vestments, woven silk, printed fabric, lace and needlework.

Visitors from a south Chicago Illinois hospital should not miss the fabulous Thorne Miniature Rooms which feature 68 doll’s house rooms on a one-to-twelve scale showing a range of architecture from peasant dwellings to palaces. Another famous Art Institute collection is the distinguished Ernest Graham Study Center with over 130,000 architectural drawings and sketches. Families will especially appreciate the Children’s Museum and the many rotating presentations at Goodman Theater and the Institute’s Film Center. Children are also fascinated with the Institute’s extensive Arms and Armor collection, as well as the collections of costumes from all over the world. The Art Institute has several pleasant restaurants including the Garden Restaurant and the Court Cafe. There is also a great gift shop on the main floor.