Southern Chicago Hospital Presents the Art Institute

Patients and visitors to a southern Chicago hospital who are lovers of art are in luck! Chicago’s famous Art Institute is a world-class museum which brings visitors from throughout the world. Founded in 1866 under the name Chicago Academy of Design, it is one of the oldest art schools in the U.S., and it is carrying on the teaching of art and design to this day. Additionally, the Art Institute’s collection presently contains over three hundred thousand works of art distributed among ten departments. The Institute’s objet d’art include paintings, sculpture, photographs, architectural drawings, prints, and textiles from all over the world and thousands of years of history.

The principle building features beaux arts architecture and was constructed for the World’s Columbian Exposition in 1893. Over the years other buildings have been constructed, and the museum presently contains over four hundred thousand square feet of space. The collection of European Painting includes 950 paintings from medieaval times to the early twentieth century, with special emphasis on French painting in the nineteenth century. The most famous exhibit at the Art Institute is the Impressionist and Post Impressionist collection, which includes A Sunday Afternoon on La Grand Jatte by Georges Seurat, Acrobats at the Circus Fernando by Jean Renoir, and thirty-three of Claude Monet’s landscapes. The Modern and Contemporary Art Department contains over 1500 sculptures and paintings from America and Europe made during the twentieth century. The world-renowned African and Amerindian collection features an exhibit of African masks, wood sculpture, ceramics, textiles, beadwork, and furniture from Central, Western and Southern Africa; and also a collection of Mesoamerican and Andes Mountains ceramics, textiles, sculpture, and metal work. South American Indian figurative art and ceramics are also well represented in this collection.

Another world-famous collection which south Chicago hospital visitors might enjoy is European Decorative Arts with over twenty-five thousand objects including ceramics, glass, furniture, metalwork, and ivory dating from the year 1100 to modern times; as well as sculpture from the middle ages to the present. The Textile Department includes over thirteen thousand examples (including over sixty-six thousand swatch samples) from 300 BCE to contemporary designs, representing Asia, Africa, Europe, Guatemala, Mexico, Peru, and Indonesia. There are special collections of pre-Colombian textiles, tapestries, European vestments, woven silk, printed fabric, lace and needlework.

Visitors from a south Chicago Illinois hospital should not miss the fabulous Thorne Miniature Rooms which feature 68 doll’s house rooms on a one-to-twelve scale showing a range of architecture from peasant dwellings to palaces. Another famous Art Institute collection is the distinguished Ernest Graham Study Center with over 130,000 architectural drawings and sketches. Families will especially appreciate the Children’s Museum and the many rotating presentations at Goodman Theater and the Institute’s Film Center. Children are also fascinated with the Institute’s extensive Arms and Armor collection, as well as the collections of costumes from all over the world. The Art Institute has several pleasant restaurants including the Garden Restaurant and the Court Cafe. There is also a great gift shop on the main floor.

What Makes a Good MLM Presentation? – Part 3 of 3

This is Part 3 of a 3-part article which I’ll discuss what makes a good MLM presentation:

Part #1 – Your state of mind

Part #2 – The problem and solution approach

Part #3 – What is your offer to your prospects?

Let’s get started…

What is your offer to your prospects so that they would want to join your MLM business?

The products?

The compensation plan?

The company?

The training?

Let’s take a look at each of the above one by one.

Would you just join a MLM business just because the product is great? Possibly. In that case, all you need to do is find a business with a great product and your business will be unstoppable in no time! But I’m sure you know that’s not the case.

How about the compensation plan or what is commonly known as ‘comp plan’? I’ve seen people who want to ‘fight’ comp plan with me, saying that who has the better comp plan will win and the loser should join him. How ridiculous? In fact, the same argument above would apply. If your offer is just that your company has the best comp plan in the world, think again.

What about the company then? Sometimes, I come across people saying wonderful things about the company they are with. That’s a good thing. However, again, all you need to do is look for the best company to join and then you’ll immediately have a booming business. Period.

Last but not least, what about the training provided then? I guess this is quite a good one. Personally, I would join a good MLM business if they provide solid training. But then, I don’t think most people would look for that and then join a MLM business.

If all of the above does not come close to a good offer so that your prospects would want to join you in your MLM business, what should you offer?

Here’s my offer that I use personally that had proved to be successful most of the time:

I offer to help them succeed, through leading and guiding them, offering them support and assistance. And I walk the talk though I’m not perfect and had made some terrible blunders in my journey.

What I’m saying here is that you actually offer to help them and keep your promise.

If you’re in this business for awhile, you might have come across people who promised you a rosy picture and when you joined them and need assistance, they are always busy or nowhere to be found.

There is a saying that goes, “Treat prospects as people and not people as prospects.”

Yes, we want prospects and downline and as many of them as possible. But on the other hand, we want to be sincere people and treat others with respect and offer to help them shorten the learning curve as they start out in their business.

Why is it so important to offer your prospects good support and assistance?

Just imagine that your prospect is considering to join your MLM company and there are currently two other distributors from your company prospecting him or her. Who do you think he or she will join? The one who offers to help or the one who just tell them to join because the products are great, the comp plan is good and the company is wonderful?

With your offer of assistance to your prospects, you will stand a much higher chance of making a compelling close.

The above concludes Part 3 of what makes a good MLM presentation.

Present Statistics In Context

“I didn’t have 3000 pairs of shoes. I had only 1600 pairs.” Imelda Marcos

Everything’s relative. A million dollars sounds like a lot of money to someone who
makes an average salary, but it’s a drop in the bucket to a Warren Buffett or a Bill
Gates. Running a hundred metres in a few seconds seems like a miracle to ordinary
mortals, but a track and field athlete will work hard to shave even more off that
time.

Yet presenters often quote statistics without benchmarks, so the audience doesn’t
know how to evaluate them. Is $10,000 a lot of money? Well it is for a bicycle. It’s
not much for a house, unless that house is in a small village in a third world
country, where it might be exorbitant. If you quote numbers this way, you will lose
the audience while they try to decide whether $125,000 is good, bad or indifferent
in this context. Your statistics lose their power.

In a presentation skills workshop for a group of lawyers, one participant was
practicing his delivery of an address to the jury in an upcoming trial. He was asking
for damages in the amount of $750,000, and hoped the jury would consider it
reasonable. It’s quite a large sum, and most ordinary folks think of that kind of cash
as a lottery win. He needed to put it in context for them.

He might, for example, ask the jury to suppose they were thirty-five years old and
earning a salary of $40,000 a year. By the time they reached the age of sixty-five,
allowing for reasonable increases, they could expect to have earned a certain
amount. (He would do the arithmetic and insert the actual sum.) That amount would
be what is called their “expected lifetime income”. However, if they were involved in
an accident and suddenly unable to work any more, that amount now represents
their “forfeited lifetime income”. That is what happened to this claimant, and the
amount he would have lost was $750,000. So in fact, counsel was asking no more
than the amount the man would have earned, had he not met with this unfortunate
accident.

Don’t you think the jury is more likely to agree when given this background
explanation?

Here are three ways to put figures in context for your audience.

1. Compare them to something to which they can personally relate, as in the
courtroom example.

2. Compare them to a similar situation. If a new manufacturing process takes fifteen
minutes, mention that the old one took two hours, so we save 1-3/4 hours.

For
even more effect, tell them how much time this will save in an average shift or on a
certain number of product units. Go further and translate that time into money and
the statistic will now be a strong argument for change.

3. Create vivid word pictures to illustrate size: That’s the equivalent of five football
fields. That’s enough to fill ten Olympic-size swimming pools. If laid end-to-end
they would stretch from New York to L.A. and back again.

Statistics can be great persuaders, but only when the audience has the means to
evaluate them.