7 top lead generation KPIs to close more sales

A lead generation KPI, or key performance indicator, is a metric that you use to measure the effectiveness of your lead generation efforts. Some top lead generation KPIs include the number of leads generated, the conversion rate from leads to sales, and the average sale amount. You should choose the KPIs that are most relevant to your business and track them over time to see how they trend. If you see that your KPIs are declining, it may be an indication that your lead generation strategy needs some tweaking. In this article, we’ll cover the 7 top lead generation KPIs to close more sales.

7 top lead generation KPIs to close more sales

#1. Conversion Rate
There are a few reasons why conversion rate is a key metric for measuring the success of lead generation campaigns. First, if potential customers are not converting into leads, then the campaign is not successful in generating new business. Second, by tracking conversion rates, you can determine which marketing tactics are most effective in attracting new customers. And finally, the conversion rate can help you to identify areas for improvement in your lead generation process.

#2. Bounce Rate
Bounce rate is a good KPI to track because it can indicate how effective your marketing and lead gen efforts are. If people are coming to your website but leaving right away, it means that you’re not providing them with what they’re looking for. On the other hand, if you have a low bounce rate, it means that you’re successfully enticing visitors to stick around and explore your site further. This makes them more likely to become leads or customers in the future.

#3. Exit Rate
Because if someone visits your website but leaves without taking any action, they’re not likely to become a customer.

Exit rate is one of the top lead generations KPIs because it can tell you how effective your website is at converting visitors into leads. If a high percentage of people are leaving your site without taking any action, you need to make changes to your website so that it’s more engaging and encourages people to take the next step.

#4. Average Session duration
There are a few reasons why average session duration can be a useful metric for lead generation. First, the longer a user spends on your site, the more likely they are to convert. This makes intuitive sense—the more time someone spends exploring your site and learning about your products or services, the more likely they are to convert.

Second, longer sessions indicate that users are finding what they need on your site and don’t need to bounce off in search of another solution. This is also valuable information; it means you’re providing a good user experience and users are finding what they need on your pages. Both of these factors contribute to higher conversion rates overall.

#5. Cost Per Acquisition (CPA)
There are a few reasons why you might want to take Cost Per Acquisition (CPA) as a lead gen KPI. First, it’s a good way to measure the effectiveness of your marketing efforts. If you can keep your CPA below a certain threshold, you’re likely making a profit on your leads. Second, it’s an easy metric to track.

You can use software or services like Google AdWords or Mixpanel to monitor your CPA and make adjustments as needed. And finally, it’s predictive. Knowing your CPA allows you to estimate how many leads you’ll need to generate in order to hit your desired revenue goal.

#6. Website traffic
There are a few reasons why website traffic can be a good metric to track when it comes to lead generation. First, if your website is getting a lot of visitors, that means you’re doing something right with your marketing and branding. And second, a high volume of website traffic usually means that there are plenty of people who may be interested in what you have to offer – making it more likely that some of them will convert into leads.

Of course, simply having a lot of website visitors doesn’t mean you’ll automatically generate a ton of leads. But it’s still a good indicator of how well your marketing efforts are working overall and can help you focus your efforts on areas that are most effective.

#7. Social Media Engagement
There are a few reasons why social media engagement can be a valuable metric for lead generation. First, when people Like or Follow your company on social media, they’re indicating an interest in what you do. This gives you the opportunity to market to them directly by promoting your products or services.

Second, Social Media Engagement can be a strong indicator of buying intent. People who engage with your company on social media are more likely to become customers, so tracking engagement levels is a good way to measure the effectiveness of your marketing campaigns.

Finally, social media engagement can help you identify potential leads. By tracking which posts generate the most interactions (Likes, Comments, Shares), you can create content that appeals to your audience. One of the best tools to handle your sales is a sales crm tool.

We hope you found this article on 7 top lead generation KPIs to close more sales useful.

The Past, the Present and the Future, It’s All in You

All of us have a past to look back at. We have fun moments we want to cherish and there are several unfortunate times we want to forget. As much as the wonderful things that we have done, there are also some that we regret doing. There are words that we wish, we never sad. And words we hoped, we had the courage to say.

Life is what we make it. And no matter how we try, the things we have done in the past cannot be undone. That is why we have been told to make the most of the time we have, because we can never regain the time lost. We can only look back, be proud or be ashamed. Some have managed to move on from the things gone wrong but others are still haunted by their decisions.

But life was not all that difficult to live with. There were times when the only decision we had to make was whether to use the professional hair straighteners or just leave the waves alone. There was a time when the choices present were just the blue and grey ties. And although these decisions did not have life changing effect on us, it had an impact on how we felt that day; a day that will probably appear in our biography.

All the decisions we made whether big or small, have contributed a lot to where we are right now. And the past is a constant reminder of the importance of the present. It tells us to stop worrying about the history that we cannot do anything about. The only things that we can affect as of the moment is the time at hand. Most of us have a lot of hang ups in what went before. And the more we linger on that thought, the more we got stuck to a motionless present which will soon become an unproductive past if we let it get the best of us.

Another wall that hinders us from dealing with the present is that we worry too much about the future. Let’s take this man as an example. Instead of attending his child’s ball games, he volunteers to stay at work to impress his employer and hopes that he will be promoted in three years. Sadly, he dies on his second year with the company; he never got promoted and missed all the games of his child. Deal with what you have at the moment to avoid would have-could have in the future.

Life may not always be as simple as professional hair straighteners or ties, but it will surely become better if we learn to let go of a past. And although thinking and preparing for a good future is not bad, we should never worry about it too much, because once we do, we end up ignoring the good things we currently have. And when we finally realized that we have so many things to be thankful for, the chance to appreciate it has already slipped away.

How Influential Are Your Business Presentations?

Just over a year ago I attended a large Sales Force Effectiveness conference and was attracted to attend for a number of reasons. Firstly, I like to keep up to date with progress within the sales industry, particularly within sales representation and sales management. Secondly, it gave me the chance to network and meet new contacts; and thirdly, as I have a very keen interest in the power of effective presenting, this would be a chance to learn from two days of watching a total of around eighteen presenters. The purpose of this article is to highlight that based on what I observed over the two days, I now believe that the level of influential presentation skill is not what it should be and to that end, I will offer a framework for sales representatives and managers to work with in order that they can develop their business presentations.

Of the eighteen presenters (all of them at a fairly high executive level in the sales 7 marketing industry) there were only two who I would consider to have above average influential presentation skills. One executive was excellent, spoke with passion and had me listening to his every word while the other, although not quite so passionate, presented in a very effective, cool, calm manner which had me engaged due to the stories that he related. The other sixteen were at best average and at worst totally ineffective.

The most common failures were:

o Too much data and information crammed on to unreadable slides.
o Talking too fast and rushing through the slides.
o No attempts to engage the audience.
o Death by Power-Point. One person attempted to go through over sixty sides in twenty minutes!
o Lack of preparation was very evident in some cases.
o Some presentations were almost identical to the previous speakers.
o Some presenters came across as ‘arrogant’ experts.

I was not impressed and wondered exactly why such senior executives were not able to present effectively. In my twenty years in the sales industry I attended numerous presentation skills courses and I felt that at the time that most of them were effective with the result that I was a good presenter. It has only been in the last few years that having to present for a living as a self employed consultant that I have realised my level of skill was not exactly what it should have been. This has been reinforced in that since becoming an elected member of the Professional Speakers Association and now having seen some serious professional speakers in action, I needed to develop further my skills. I now believe that perhaps the traditional approach to developing presentation skills may be slightly flawed. Let me explain.

On all the skills courses I have attended much of the focus of the training has been on the speaker or presenter themselves, in terms of their body language, voice pitch and tone. There has been a huge emphasis on the use of video so that participants can see themselves on the ‘replay’ and in ‘slow motion’. A coach or trainer will assist in the video analysis thereby reinforcing that the presenter has some unique ‘mannerisms’ that desperately need changed! The end result of this is that I believe the presenter remains focused on their various body movements or ‘mannerisms’ such as what they do with their hands or feet and as such this switches the focus away from where it really should be – the audience. The best presenters I have seen concentrate fully on the audience, engaging them with both the content, their energy and their enthusiasm. Some of the best presenters I have encountered would have been ‘destroyed’ by the video analysis in that their hands were doing this or their feet doing that! In terms of the excellent presenters, these ‘mannerisms’ were not picked up by the general audience because they were not evident to them due to the nature of the presenter’s content and the overall skill and energy that they projected. One aspect of presenting that every professional presenter agrees must be a priority is that of planning, preparation and practice. This is a must for anyone who presents and the old adage, ‘fail to plan, plan to fail’ is very apt! Planning, preparation and practice builds confidence and with confidence comes the automatic reaction of focusing on your audience and not on yourself.

I have developed my E5 Presenting with Influence formula and this I believe will give sales executives and managers a framework to base the preparation and execution of their presentation around, whether it is to a group of customers or within a team business meeting situation.

ENGAGE How do you engage your audience from the start and how do you keep them engaged?
How do you manage that engagement and still keep on track?

ENLIGHTEN What does the audience know about you?
How will you manage their expectations as to what you are going to present?

EDUCATE Does your content meet the needs of the audience?
How are you going to present new information?
What evidence do you have to back up your claims?

ENTERTAIN Even the most ‘serious’ audiences want to be entertained, perhaps not through jokes (dangerous tactic!) but through real life stories and anecdotes. Do you have real life scenarios to reinforce your key messages?

ENCOURAGE In every presentation you will want the audience to react in a way that is positive. If it is a sales presentation you want at the very least a follow up meeting to discuss the opportunity further, at best, a clear commitment to buy. Your presentation must deliver encouragement to act.

The best way to deliver presentation skills training is not to emphasise the use of video but to create a learning environment whereby a training course is based around regular practice in front of peers. The feedback from peers, in the role of the audience, is far more powerful than reviewing the video footage with a trainer or coach. Presenting is about planning, preparation and providing your audience with a powerful, passionate message that will make them feel motivated to act as you would like them to. So, if you have had feedback that you stroke your nose, twiddle your thumbs, or stand at the ‘wrong’ side of the stage then provided your audience is engaged, enlightened, educated, entertained and encouraged to act then so what!